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Making

Glazed – Handle with Care.

Last year, I visited Nassos Keramik on the island of Rhodes, Greece. This particular outlet has been producing handmade ceramics in a traditional style since 1964. Its founder, Nassos Mylonas, had learnt his trade at the ICAROS factory which had been established by the Italians in Rhodes in 1928 to reproduce the traditional, regional ‘Iznik’ designs.

I was fortunate enough to be invited to visit Nassos Keramik with a friend who was learning how to decorate the ceramics in that traditional style. Even more so, the next day, to be taken on a guided tour around the exhibition ‘ICARO – ΙΚΑΡΟΣ The Factory of Rhodes 1928-1988’ at the Grand Master’s Palace in Rhodes Old Town.

This visit was a while ago, but it is never far from my mind. My memories can travel, even while I cannot. They have a fine, translucent glaze and I handle them with care.

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Making

How Can We Tell?

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Artist: Mark Titchner

Installation: Some Questions About Colchester

Commission: Our Colchester Business Improvement District, with Firstsite

As seen today, on my walk for Tuesday, in Colchester High Street.

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Making

Zero Heroes

Last month, I celebrated my birthday sober to help raise funds for Macmillan Cancer Support. It’s a cause close to my heart (and other organs) and, of course, I’m not alone. This, though, did not mean I had to forgo fizz on my big day, oh no.

I was fully prepared to feel virtuous with my summer-time favourite, Elderflower Pressé and indeed I did (and still do), it’s effervescently refreshing whether drunk straight, or as a mixer (with dry white wine or vodka for – my – preference).

However, I decided to research some alternatives. I’d long derided alcohol-free wine as sickly-sweet grape juice with zero complexity, but was prepared to change my mind – and, I did. So, as a mark of my humility and the quality of my tireless research in this area during October, I’d like to share my top three zero heroes with you.

Here they are, in no particular order…

Torres Natureo De-Alcoholised Muscat, 0.5%

This one definitely came as a surprise to me – the muscat grape is not one of my favourites. I expected it to be much sweeter than it is, but, although the nose says muscat, the tongue says a very crisp round apple. It helps to serve this deeply chilled (you and the wine).

Fizzero Rosé, 0%

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Making

Lâchez-Vous!

I said a mellow goodbye to Sober October with a fruity friend from the Languedoc. The well-named Lâchez-Vous! is a full-bodied Syrah/Grenache blend, red-purple in colour with the scent and taste of black and red berries. Dry and smooth, it went down very easily as I said hello to November.

The next day, on a casual wander through Colchester, I visited a (relatively) new off-licence at Fenwick, just to browse. Winter is coming, so I headed to the whisky section which, though compact, had interest. There, late to the game (the distillery, Mackmyra, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year), I discovered that Sweden produces whisky.

Thanks to an attentive sales assistant, I also discovered that Sweden produces good whisky. She noted my interest and asked if I would like to taste two of those Swedish whiskies they had in stock. I agreed and she fetched the bottles.

The first, Svensk Rök, is a smoky single malt whisky made exclusively from Swedish ingredients. Flavoured with juniper, it’s light, mildly spicy and peaty in character. The second, Mackmyra Äppelblom is also a single malt and is finished in Calvados-saturated oak casks from Christian Drouin. It has a richer dry-toffee-apple character. I enjoyed tasting both, but, if I had to choose, would take the Äppelblom for an autumn-into-winter drink. The apple and the Calvados are very persuasive.

So, cheers, dear reader, wherever you are and however you mark this season – here’s a toast to new discoveries – lâchez-vous!

Lâchez-Vous!
Mackmyra Whisky

 

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Making

Saturday Morning in Colour

Last Saturday in our mixed media art class, it was time to work with acrylic paint and oil pastels – depicting what we could see from the windows of Studio 2 of the FirstSite gallery.

The site is Scheduled Ancient Monument land, and there are archaeological artefacts beneath the building. So, no digging was permitted in its construction; the entire structure is supported by a floating concrete raft. Perhaps this is why when others look out onto the greensward, I see air and water: whatever I paint comes back to seascapes.

In breaks, there were the cosplay fencers to watch and the Magda Archer exhibition to enjoy. And coffee, as always. This week, too, a homeless man had set up camp under one of the older trees with his supermarket trolley and bicycle – mildly entertained by the swordplay and not at all by the painting.

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Making

Saturday Morning in Black and White

This weekend, it was back to school for me; art classes started again after the Easter break. The portrait drawing classes I took from January until Easter I enjoyed so much I didn’t need to think twice about signing up for these mixed media classes. There are other classes I would love to follow, too, but they clash with my teaching hours. Anyway, on Saturday we experimented with white acrylic paint, chalk and charcoal (assisted by coffee).

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Making

True Colours

I’ve been away from myself too long, far too long. Not my better self, you understand, just me.

And so I was coming home when I signed up for art classes in January. Every second Saturday, I left everything else behind as I walked into the studio for portrait class. I was just me.

After Easter, the journey continues into mixed media. I’m getting there. Just me.

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Making

We Are Our Stories.

‘We are our stories, stories that can be both prison and the crowbar to break open the door of that prison; we make stories to save ourselves or to trap ourselves or others, stories that lift us up or smash us against the stone wall of our own limits and fears. Liberation is always in part a storytelling process: breaking stories, breaking silences, making new stories.’

Rebecca Solnit, ‘Silence Is Broken’, in ‘The Mother of All Questions’ (07/03/2017).

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Making

Mural

As seen today on the rear wall of a house in the Dutch Quarter, backing on to Colchester Castle Park, Essex. A feast for the eyes and food for thought.

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Making

Number 18

My GP (general practitioner, or family doctor) is based at Durlston House, or number 18 North Hill, Colchester. I have a long connection to North Hill, perhaps longer than I realise, specifically number 47 with its key place in my personal history.

Number 18 lies on the east side of North Hill and has its own stories to tell, of course. It was given Grade II listed status in 1950 – recognising its late 16th-century structure with Georgian facade and its 18th-century oriel window over the central doorcase. Yet earlier, in the 19th-century, Roman tessellated paving and medieval walling had been discovered in the back garden.

There are exposed wooden beams throughout the house, perhaps the most eye-catching of which are in the north room downstairs, now the surgery waiting room. Here, the walls are covered with public health notices, an electronic screen flashes the names of patients, doctors, and rooms, and the obligatory leisure magazines sit, neglected, on a corner table.

If those waiting (sometimes) patiently only look up to the beams, they can see there painted inscriptions. The medical practice has thoughtfully transcribed, printed out and framed them as a poster for the patient to read and make of what they will. Here, as so often in life (and medicine), there is no explanation.